THE FATHER HIMSELF LOVES YOU.

Jack Winter was a true pioneer in sharing Father’s love across the globe. In November 1997, he was speaking at a conference at Toronto Airport Christian Fellowship Church, his topic was “The Father Himself Loves You,” Jack shared a prophetic word he received from Father which revealed so much about Father’s desire that we would walk in freedom as His sons and daughters, enjoying the gift of the life He has given us.
Father said, “All that I have ever purposed and planned, I have purposed and planned with you in mind. My love. I will never enjoy anything throughout all eternity but what I can share with you. I only ask that you enjoy nothing but what you can share with Me.”
This is the relationship Father is wanting to bring us into, as our life flows from this relationship.

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YOU ARE NOT MERELY ONE OF THE CROWD!

While attending a conference a few weeks ago in Holland, Trevor Galpin spoke about an aspect of the Parable of the Lost Son. When the younger son in the story was making his way home, his father was aware of his presence although he was still a distance away from the family home. “But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him.” (Luke 15:20)
For many of us we can allow ourselves to believe that Father loves all His children, which He does. It can be more of a challenge to believe that He has a constant awareness of each of us and loves each of us as the individual He has created us to be. So, in the crowd of children He created, Father sees each of us, we are not invisible to Him, within the crowd of His creation.
The good news is that we have a Father who exists outside of time, who is aware of and is loving you as His child constantly. You are not merely one of a crowd, you have an individual place in His Heart that is yours and no one else can fill. I love the way this is expressed in the Shack, when Papa says, “I am especially fond of…… (insert your name).

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Will you trust?

The recent blog on ‘Seeking God’s Face’, which explored the value of stillness in God’s presence as a way of experiencing his love, might have given the impression that receiving and living in Father’s love is essentially a passive experience. That is very far from the truth, for through Jesus Father invites us into a vibrant relationship in which we experience the ‘more abundant life’ for which he created us. When we say that his love is a gift which we cannot earn, we are not saying that we have no part to play.
I suggested that ‘pursuing love’ or ‘seeking God’s face’ is not a matter of striving to gain access to his presence, or to earn his love by our efforts, but rather a positioning of heart and mind. His love constantly invites us to make choices – choices which are (or seem to be) risky and costly.
To put it very simply, the key to experiencing Father’s love is learning to trust him, for ‘the Lord delights in those who fear him, who put their hope in his unfailing love’ (Psalms ‭147:11‬). This truth is central to a book which I received as a birthday gift a few weeks ago – Patched Together by Brennan Manning. It is the story of Willie Juan, whom we meet as a boy, a young man, and in old age, as he learns and relearns, in the midst of brokenness, abandonment and disappointment, to trust in God’s love for him. ‘The question of your life has always been “Will you trust?” You are being asked once again, Willie Juanito. Don’t worry; all will be well.’1‬‬‬
When he invites us into his love, Father challenges us to let go the other things we rely on for significance and security. For me, that included a rewarding job which gave me both financial security and a sense of achievement. Over a period of time I sensed that I was being asked to give it up. My first reaction was to say: ‘Certainly, Father. Just show me what you want me to do instead.’ That sounds like trusting obedience, but it wasn’t. I was looking for a guarantee, but to experience the love he was offering I had to learn to walk by trust, not by sight.
More time passed. The feeling that I should leave my job grew stronger, but I had no sense of what was to come next. Then Father spoke to me through two Bible stories.
The first was the story of his call to Abraham, and Abraham’s response:
The Lord had said to Abram, “Go from your country, your people and your father’s household to the land I will show you” (Genesis 12:1).
By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing where he was going (Hebrews 11:8).
Those words ‘not knowing where he was going’ brought home to me the fact that our trust in Father, and with it our experience of his love, will only grow when we can’t see clearly what’s ahead. ‘Do we ever really trust when we can see?’ Willie Juan is asked towards the end of his life. ‘I’d love to tell you otherwise’, he replies, ‘but what faith I have has been strengthened in the dark. It’s just the way it is.’2
Then God nudged me again through Mark’s account of Jesus’ meeting with the rich young man:
As he was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good except God alone. You know the commandments: Do not murder, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honour your father and mother.’” And he said to him, “Teacher, all these I have kept from my youth.” 21And Jesus, looking at him, loved him, and said to him, “You lack one thing: go, sell all that you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.” (Mark 10:17-22).
‘Jesus, looking at him, loved him.’ Those words caught my attention and my heart. I realised that in their challenge to the young man, and their invitation to me to give up the security of my job without knowing the next step, Jesus and his Father were motivated only by love. They were inviting me to step into ‘the dazzling darkness of sheer trust’3, and live in their marvellous love.
I handed in my notice, and some months later, when I finally left the job, Father spoke these amazing words of comfort and reassurance to my heart:
‘Let the beloved of the Lord rest secure in him, for he shields him all day long, and the one the Lord loves rests between his shoulders’ Deuteronomy 33:12. In the years which followed, he has backed up his words with faithful provision.
Willie Juan’s story, which Brennan Manning describes as ‘in many ways my story’, highlights two important aspects of our life in the ‘dazzling darkness of sheer trust’. They ring true with my own experience. First of all, the joyous comfort which we receive as we open our hearts to Father’s love utterly outweighs whatever risk or sacrifice that trust involves. It is the ‘pearl of greatest price’.
Second, however, is the reminder that our trust in Father needs to be continually renewed. It is so easy to forget his goodness. The voices which undermine trust are persistent, and they use every hurt and disappointment to draw us away from Father, to doubt his goodness, and to look for comfort and security elsewhere.
In the introduction to Patched Together Brennan Manning writes: ‘For years now I’ve written about how much Abba loves ragamuffins. Sometimes, these days, I wrestle to believe what I wrote. Knowing that you’re reading and wrestling along with me means more than you know.’4
How attractive and how important that honest declaration is. We are learning that when we acknowledge our weakness, to ourselves and others, our eyes are opened to receive a fresh glimpse of Father’s faithfulness and love, and our trust in him is rekindled.

1Patched Together, Brennan Manning, David Cook 2010, p 120
2ibid. p122
3ibid. p122
4ibid. pp15-16

A prayer
Father, you know us just as we are, in all our weakness and brokenness.
Thank you for your free and unfailing love for us, and for the promise of your presence and provision.
Give us day by day the grace and courage to choose to trust you and live in your love, like your son Jesus.
Set us from the fear and bitterness and unforgiveness which separate us from you and one another.

indled.
1Patched Together, Brennan Manning, David Cook 2010, p 120
2ibid. p122
3ibid. p122
4ibid. pp15-16
________________________________________
A prayer
Father, you know us just as we are, in all our weakness and brokenness.
Thank you for your free and unfailing love for us, and for the promise of your presence and provision.
Give us day by day the grace and courage to choose to trust you and live in your love, like your son Jesus.
Set us from the fear and bitterness and unforgiveness which separate us from you and one another.

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Seeking His Face

Seeking God’s face
You have said, “Seek my face.”
My heart says to you, “Your face, LORD, do I seek.” Psalm 27:8
A previous blog (3 June 2017) ended with the paradoxical thought that the love we are invited to pursue (1 Corinthians 14:1) is already pursuing us (Psalm 23:6). This theme – that God seeks us and at the same time calls us to seek him – runs through the whole of scripture, and when we look closely we see that our heavenly Father always makes the first move. In asking us to seek his face, he is inviting us into continuous intimacy with him in response to the revelation of his love for us. Biblical examples of this pattern are not hard to find. In the Old Testament we see it in the stories of Abraham, Jacob, Moses, Samuel and David, and in the New Testament when Jesus calls the first disciples, visits the home of Zacchaeus, and confronts Saul on the road to Damascus.
Although they share a common underlying theme, every story is different, because Father relates to each one of us as a unique individual. His pursuing love is persistent, yet gentle. It does not coerce, but gives us a choice. When he tells us to ‘pursue love’ or ‘seek his face’, he is asking us to position ourselves to receive and live in his love.
‘Seeking God’s face’ is not a matter of striving to gain access to his presence, for we can never earn his love by our efforts. It is, rather, a positioning of heart and mind. In a well-known Old Testament verse ‘seeking God’s face’ is linked with humility and repentance (2 Chronicles 7:14). Humility is trusting dependence on God as our creator and redeemer, rather than on our own resources of wisdom and wealth. Repentance recognises that God’s image in us has been damaged by our choices and actions, and is willing to let his love work in us to heal that damage so that our lives and relationships reflect his goodness and faithfulness.
Humility and repentance are not about ‘trying harder’. Quite the opposite! As we learn to accept the futility of our efforts to please God and earn his love, and acknowledge our helplessness and dependence on him, our hearts are opened to recognise and receive his unconditional love for us. In 2 Chronicles 7:14, when God calls Israel to seek his face, he addresses them as ‘my people’. He has always loved them; they are already his ‘treasured possession’. He longs for them to experience his love and the blessing that goes with it, but their sinful self-reliance gets in the way.
That was my experience for many years as a Christian. I was actively involved in many church activities, but had little sense of intimacy with God or of any spiritual progress in my life. When that made me feel uncomfortable my response was to work harder or seek distractions. I recognised a longing in myself for a real experience of God’s love, but I didn’t know how to achieve it.
Over the past twenty years all that has changed. Looking back I can see clearly how Father God took the initiative to reveal his love to me in a new way. He led me, gently yet relentlessly, to lay down first my work in church, and then my job, as he brought me to a place where I realised that his love for me is utterly unconditional. For years my sense of self-worth had been based – precariously – on my activity and achievement. Father showed me that ‘he loves me when I do nothing’! For someone who had been raised in a culture imbued with the ‘Protestant work ethic’ these words seemed scandalous at first, yet they are true. God is love, and his love for us is an everlasting love, so nothing I do can make him love me any more or any less.
On one occasion some years ago, as I was resting quietly, enjoying God’s presence, I began to think about the story of the woman who anointed Jesus with expensive ointment (Matthew 26:6-13). The indignant disciples thought it was a waste, but Jesus said ‘She has done a beautiful thing for me.’ A question formed in my mind: ‘Father, what precious thing do I have that I can waste on you?’ The answer – both shocking and delightful – came instantly: ‘I want you to waste your time on me.’
A few months later a friend gave me the book Clowning in Rome by Henri Nouwen, in which I found the following passage:
‘Contemplative prayer is not a way of being busy with God instead of with people, but is an attitude in which we recognize God’s ultimate priority by being useless in his presence, by standing in front of him without anything to show, to prove, or to argue, and by allowing him to enter our emptiness… It is not useful or practical, but a way of wasting time for God. It cuts a hole in our busyness and reminds us and others that it is God and not we who creates and sustains the world… In this useless prayer, God can show us his love. When we are empty, free, and open, we can be with him, look at him, listen to him, and slowly begin to realize that he is our loving Father who loves us with a deep, intimate affection.’*
*Clowning in Rome, Henri J M Nouwen, Image Books 1979, p 53

A prayer
Father, thank you for your unconditional and everlasting love for me.
Give me the grace to recognise and lay down my self-reliance, and truly acknowledge my dependence on you.
You invite me to pursue love and seek your face. Bring my heart to that place of rest and stillness where it is open to receive and experience your love, and to be healed and transformed by it.
In the name of King Jesus, your Son, who shows us how much you love us, and brings us into your presence as he calls us to share his life of intimacy with you.

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YOU ARE NOT MERELY ONE OF THE CROWD!

While attending a conference a few weeks ago in Holland, Trevor Galpin spoke about an aspect of the Parable of the Lost Son. When the younger son in the story was making his way home, his father was aware of his presence although he was still a distance away from the family home. “But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him.” (Luke 15:20)
For many of us we can allow ourselves to believe that Father loves all His children, which He does. It can be more of a challenge to believe that He has a constant awareness of each of us and loves each of us as the individual He has created us to be. So, in the crowd of children He created, Father sees each of us, we are not invisible to Him, within the crowd of His creation.
The good news is that we have a Father who exists outside of time, who is aware of and is loving you as His child constantly. You are not merely one of a crowd, you have an individual place in His Heart that is yours and no one else can fill. I love the way this is expressed in the Shack, when Papa says, “I am especially fond of…… (insert your name).

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Pursue Love

Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.
Love never ends.
1 Corinthians 13:4-8

A few years ago I was asked to read the thirteenth chapter of Paul’s first letter to the church at Corinth at my son’s wedding. In the weeks before the ceremony, as I prepared a brief introduction to the reading, I reflected on its meaning in the light of the revelation of Father’s love.
This familiar passage, with its eloquent description of love, is an understandably popular reading at weddings. When I read it or hear it read it arouses a longing in me to love and be loved in the way Paul describes. But there is a problem. If we see it primarily as a pattern to be followed, Paul’s picture of love seems beautiful, but idealistic. How are we to respond to the standard he appears to be setting for us? We may dismiss it as unrealistic – unattainable in this life. We may strive to live up to it, only to fall into cynicism or despair when we fail. Or we may deceive ourselves that we have succeeded, and be tempted to preen ourselves with pride.
Paul introduces his words about love by saying ‘I will show you a still more excellent way’ (1 Corinthians 12:31), but when we look carefully at what follows we see that he does not in fact lay down a set of rules. Rather, he speaks about his own experience:
If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing (1 Corinthians 13:1-3)
Paul states three times that his life has no significance or value if he ‘has not love’. It is clear that for him ‘having love’ is what gives life meaning. Nothing else is of value without love. It is, in Jesus’ words, the ‘pearl of greatest price’.
But what does he mean by ‘having love’? (In case you’re wondering, this is a literal translation of Paul’s words in Greek.) It seems to me that ‘having love’ can be understood in two ways. For years I had only thought of it as ‘having love for others’. But now I’ve come to think that when Paul speaks of ‘having love’, he is also referring to the love he receives from Father God. This is the love he (and we) cannot live without. Knowing this love gives his life meaning and value. Without it all his gifting and faith and devotion are worthless. (This reminds me of his words in Philippians 3:7-8: ‘Whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord.’)
After this repeated declaration of the surpassing importance of ‘having love’, Paul goes on in verses 4-7 to describe this love, and it is surely clear that he is writing primarily not about the way we are to love one another, but about the way God loves us. He is describing the ‘unfailing love’ of the ‘Father of compassion and God of all comfort’ (2 Corinthians 1:3), who is ‘merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin’ (Exodus 34:6-7). It is the love which Jesus displayed in his life and death as he ‘loved us to the end’ (John 13:1). It is the love of the Holy Spirit, the Comforter, sent by the Father and the Son, through whom‘God’s love is poured into our hearts’ (Romans 5:5).
Of course Paul longs to have a love for others which reflects the love he receives from God; of course he longs for the Christians in Corinth to show that sort of love to one another. But he knows that we can never have love for others unless we first have God’s love in our hearts, and when he ends this section of the letter by urging his readers to ‘pursue love’, he is encouraging them to enter a deeper experience of God’s love for them, which is the only way in which they will have the spiritual resources to love others as they are loved. In the words of John Arnott, of ‘Catch the Fire’, he was inviting them to ‘walk in God’s love, and give it away’.
Paradoxically, the best way of ‘pursuing’ God’s love is to stand still, for his love is already pursuing us! ‘Surely,’ sang David, ‘your goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life’ (Psalm 23:6). (The Hebrew word translated as ‘follow’ in this verse is translated as ‘pursue’ in more than 70 other Old Testament passages!)
When Saul (not yet Paul) was pursuing Jesus’ first followers, Jesus the Good Shepherd was pursuing him. He had to stop him in his tracks (Acts 9:3) in order to reveal his love to him. In stillness and brokenness and humility he became open to the flow of God’s love into his heart. From that moment Father’s love – revealed in King Jesus and poured into his heart by the Holy Spirit – was the motivating and compelling power in his life.
Back in Psalm 23, it’s no surprise that David, describing the blessings he receives from his Shepherd Lord, puts stillness and rest at the top of the list: ‘He makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside quiet waters, he refreshes my soul’ (vv.2-3). It is in stillness that we discover just how much we are loved.
A prayer:
Father, like Paul, we want to ‘have love’. We want to know and experience your love for us, and to learn to love like you. Open our hearts to a fresh revelation of your steadfast love for us, and by your Spirit guide and empower us as we learn to love as we are loved. In the name of Jesus, who loved us and gave himself for us.

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EASTER REFLECTION.

Father, Lord of all creation,
We praise you for your goodness and your love.
When we turned away you did not reject us.
You came to meet us in your Son,
Welcomed us as your children
And prepared a table where we might feast with you.

In Christ you shared our life
That we might live in Him and He in us.
He opened wide his arms upon the cross
And, with love stronger than death,
He made the perfect sacrifice for sin.

Father of all, we give you thanks and praise,
That when we were still far off
You met us in your Son and brought us home.
Dying and living, He declared your love,
Gave us grace, and opened the gate of glory.

FATHER YOU GAVE US THE PERFECT GIFT…THE GIFT OF YOUR PERFECT SON!

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THE DEPTH OF LOVE by MARK GYDE.

“You’ve learned to be a servant but
God wants you to be a son.”

Mark Gyde recently published his third book, The Depth of Love.” The sleeve notes provide a useful overview of the content.

“Many of us have learned to be servants and actually become quite good at it. Yet we all need to hear the Father calling us by name and speaking these words into our hearts: “you are my beloved son,” you are my beloved daughter.” When these words take root in our hearts, everything changes as we begin to discover the amazing depth of the Father’s love.”

Barry Adams is a co-host with Mark on a weekly webcast, he said of the book:
“Mark’s new book, the Depth of Love, wonderfully expresses this growing revelation of sonship. Mark does not shy away from some of the tough topics like hardship and suffering but deals with them in a very practical way. With the help of the Holy spirit, Mark has been able to put substance to the eternal love which predates creation, in order that we can tangibly experience it in our everyday lives.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who is longing to go deeper into the immeasurable ocean of Trinitarian love that Jesus Christ secured for us on the cross two thousand years ago.”

For more information regarding this book and Mark’s previous publications, his web address is www.afathertoyou.com

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The Heart of Prayer

At the very heart of Jesus’ vision of the kingdom — of heaven’s kingdom coming on earth — we have a picture of one person, secretly in their own room, praying.

Prayer is a mystery. I’ve often heard people saying, with a sneer, ‘It doesn’t go beyond the ceiling, you know.’ But the point of prayer, at least the way Jesus saw it, is that it doesn’t have to. Your father, he says, is there in the secret place with you. He sees and knows your deepest thoughts and hopes and fears. He hears the words you say. He hears, too, the things you can’t put into words but want to lay before him anyway. Prayer, in fact, isn’t a mystery in the sense of ‘a puzzle we can’t understand’. Prayer is a symptom, a sign, of the mystery: the fact that heaven and earth actually mingle together. There are times when they interlock; there are places where they overlap. To pray, in this sense, is to claim a time and place — it can be anywhere, any time — as one of those times, one of those places.

If prayer is about heaven and earth overlapping in time and space, it’s also about them coming together in matter, in the stuff of this world, the clay from which we are made. To pray, in this sense, is to claim — think about it and realize just how daring this is! — that the living God, enthroned in heaven, can make his home with you, within you. To make this point vividly, go into your room in secret and pray there. Take God seriously.

But, when you do so, realize one more thing. If prayer is about heaven and earth coming together at one time, in one place, within the lump of clay we call ‘me’, then it’s going to change this person called ‘me’. In particular, it’s going to make me a forgiver. Jesus was quite clear about this. All of us have been hurt, wounded, slighted, annoyed by other people. How much more have we ourselves done that to God! Yet we want him to be with us, to hear us, and — yes! — to forgive us. How can we not be forgivers too?

So the great prayer comes together. Utterly simple, utterly profound. A child can learn it; an old, wise saint will still be going deeper into it. Heaven is not far away, and it’s where we meet the God who, with breathtaking confidence, we can call ‘Father’. Familiarity must not imply contempt. His very name is holy, and we must honour it as such. And what we most want — the strange phenomenon of which prayer itself is a supreme example! — is that his kingdom should come and his will be done on earth as in heaven. When we pray, we pray for that goal but we also pray within that promise.

We then place our needs, whether simple or complex, within that framework. Bread for the day ahead. Forgiveness of debt — the debts we owe to God, the debts too (this may surprise some) we owe one another. And then, importantly, rescue: rescue from the time of testing, of trial, whether that be personal temptation, frequently repeated, or the ‘tribulation’ which Jesus, like many others of his day, believed would come upon the world before God’s deliverance finally dawned.

And rescue, too, from the evil one. Much of Jesus’ public career was a battle with the powers of darkness. That isn’t surprising, since he was announcing that God was taking back control of the world from those powers. When we pray this prayer, we are caught up in that battle, too. But we don’t face the danger alone. We claim his victory, his rescue, rather than face danger alone, his deliverance. The mystery of prayer. This prayer lies at the very centre of the ‘sermon on the mount’. It should be at the centre of our life, our own kingdom-obedience.

Lord, teach us to pray; teach us to forgive; make us your people. Yours is the kingdom, the power and the glory.

Tom Wright, commenting on Matthew 6:5-15 in Lent for Everyone (SPCK)

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JESUS SAID, “I AM THE VINE.”

I was recently reminded of a story told by Paul Reid, the former senior pastor of Belfast’s largest charismatic church, C.F.C.
Paul met with a friend who was an apple grower from Co. Armagh. Paul engaged him in a lengthy discussion on the complexities of growing apples. Eventually his friend said to Paul, “I don’t really focus much time or attention on apples, I just look after trees.”
This story really impacted me, in that it seems to say a lot about the futility of us being preoccupied with the fruit of our lives rather than seeing good fruit as the outcome of the care and attention from a skilled and attentive gardener looking after a plant, and good fruit is just the outcome of this tender care.
In John’s gospel, Mirror Bible Translation we have a beautiful picture of this process. Jesus said, “I am the authentic vine! My father is the farmer. Every offshoot in me that does not bear fruit, He lifts from the ground and fastens it to the stake and every fruit bearing part he dresses to maximise its yield, (# see footnote). Your personal pruning and dressing already happened in your conversion; The word made flesh in my person and language is how the Father prepares and sets you up for fruit bearing. Our seamless union, You in me and I in you, is pictured in the vine: the shoot cannot bear fruit outside of this union. In its abiding in the vine, fruit happens naturally – as with your abiding in me. I am the vine and you are the branches; it is the one who understands this mutual union that naturally bears much fruit – which is impossible to happen apart from me. Every area of human life that does not continue to be entwined in this place of seamlessness in me, was already cast forth where it was withered away and is gathered to be burned as firewood. My words find voice in you. With your abiding in me and my words abiding in you a conversation is inspired where you will request that which arises in your desire from our union and it shall come to pass for you! These unions – inspired desires bear the very fruit that endorses the Father’s glory. This is where true discipleship is born. The love of the Father for Me is my love for you – abide in my Love for you!” (John 15: 1-9).
(#) Footnote. Many translations of the Greek in verse two state “He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, as in the NIV. This is an inaccurate translation of the Greek words “airei and “kathairei” These words “airei” and “kathairei” are employed to suggest the lifting of the branches as well as the dressing process which includes pruning. On other occasions when “airei” is used it is translated as “lifted up.” Father doesn’t cut us off, He tenderly deals with us until, in our knowledge of our union with Jesus, we can rest in His love and naturally bear the fruit He desires.
THANK YOU, FATHER, AS THE SKILLED AND TENDER GARDENER YOU CARE FOR US WITH LOVE AND KINDNESS AND THIS PRODUCES THE GOOD FRUIT.

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